Review of politics

New article: The Natural Laws of Good Manners: Hobbes, Glory, and Early Modern Civility

Mark, Clifton (2018): The Natural Laws of Good Manners: Hobbes, Glory, and Early Modern Civility, in: The Review of Politics, Volume 80, Issue 3, Summer 2018 , pp. 391-414.

Abstract
According to Hobbes, glory causes conflict in two ways: by causing competition over comparative recognition, and by making men violently sensitive to insult. Interpreters have generally depicted the sensitivity to insult as a manifestation of the desire for comparative recognition. This reading raises two problems. First, the two ways in which Hobbes uses glory are inconsistent. Second, if the problem with glory is comparison, then the law of nature enjoining the acknowledgment of equality should lead to war rather than peace. This paper illuminates these obscurities by placing Hobbes in the context of the contemporary literature on honor and civility. These sources reveal two concepts of honor which correspond to the two ways in which Hobbes writes about glory. Hobbes draws heavily from these sources, but intentionally elides the two concepts of honor in order to undermine an ideology of honor that was used to justify disobedience and unlawful violence.