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Three-Text Edition of Thomas Hobbes’s Political Theory

Deborah Baumgold (2017) (ed.): Three-Text Edition of Thomas Hobbes’s Political Theory. The Elements of Law, De Cive and Leviathan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

An exciting English-language edition which for the first time presents Thomas Hobbes’s masterpiece Leviathan alongside two earlier works, The Elements of Law and De Cive.

Reviews:

‘This edition constitutes a remarkable undertaking. It has been executed with precision and astute judgement throughout and will prove invaluable for anyone doing serious research on the development of Hobbes’s political theory.’ Robin Douglass – King’s College London

‘Baumgold’s arrangement of Hobbes’s three major political treatises in parallel columns greatly facilitates our study of the changes in his views over a decade and also the evaluation of claims that those changes were significant. For Hobbes scholars, Baumgold’s book is the equivalent of ‘Gospel Parallels’.’ Al Martinich – Vaughan Centennial Professor in Philosophy, University of Texas, Austin

‘Deborah Baumgold’s brilliantly executed parallel-text edition demonstrates her thesis that Hobbes wrote his political theory three times over as the English civil war unfolded, in Elements, De Cive and Leviathan, each for different audiences.’ Patricia Springborg – Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

‘How did Hobbes compose, think, and rethink his political philosophy? Deborah Baumgold’s edition offers new insights and will spur fruitful contributions to our debates for year to come.’ Ted H. Miller – University of Alabama

‘That Hobbes wrote three versions of his political theory is widely recognized; that no one has yet published his three key theoretical texts together is remarkable. Baumgold’s text thus fills a very important gap in Hobbes scholarship, bringing together The Elements, De Cive, and Leviathan in an accessible, elegant, and precise form. The Three-Text Edition of Thomas Hobbes’s Political Theory will be an essential resource for scholars and readers.’ Daniel Kapust – University of Wisconsin, Madison